Engaged Scholarship Expos Courses

Engaged Scholarship Expos courses give first-year students an exciting chance to connect the “theory and practice” of academic research and writing. Supported by Harvard's Mindich Program in Engaged Scholarship (MPES), these courses "challenge students and faculty to integrate scholarship with community perspectives, knowledge, and expertise to have impact within and beyond the academy" (MPES). In Engaged Scholarship Expos courses, students go outside the classroom into neighborhoods and organizations to see real-world issues up close. By the end of the semester, students will have used writing and speaking as crucial tools for developing evidence-based arguments about those issues--and for communicating their thinking with audiences well beyond the classroom.
 

Engaged Scholarship Expos courses welcome students who are passionate and intellectually curious about the course topics, willing to interrogate their assumptions continually throughout the semester, and committed to rewarding work outside of class. 

 

Spring 2020 Engaged Scholarship Courses

 

Course Title

Preceptor

Days

Start

End

Location

Whose Boston?*

Brown, Willa

T/Th

1:30PM

2:45PM

Sever Hall 211

Whose Boston?*

Brown, Willa

T/Th

3:00PM

4:15PM

Sever Hall 211

Green Spaces, Urban Places*

Case, Sarah

M/W

1:30PM

2:45PM

Sever Hall 112

Green Spaces, Urban Places*

Case, Sarah

M/W

3:00PM

4:15PM

Sever Hall 112

Sexism & Politics*

Saha, Sparsha

T/TH

9:00AM

10:15AM

CGIS Knafel

Sexism & Politics*

Saha, Sparsha

T/TH

10:30AM

11:45AM

CGIS Knafel

Ecological Crisis: Witnessing & Planning in the…*

Strub, Spencer

T/TH

1:30PM

2:45PM

Sever 112

Ecological Crisis: Witnessing & Planning in the…*

Strub, Spencer

T/TH

3:00PM

4:15PM

Sever 112

 

Engaged Scholarship Course Descriptions

 

Additional course descriptions forthcoming. 

 

WHOSE BOSTON?

(Engaged Scholarship Course)

Willa Brown

 

Each year over three million visitors walk Boston’s Freedom Trail, learning a curated story of how this country came to be. But whose story is it? This engaged scholarship course will leave the Yard in order to think about how the stories we tell shape the city we live in. In the wake of the riots in Charlottesville over the removal of a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee, Americans are embroiled in a debate long familiar to historians: what do our monuments say about who we are? Maybe more importantly: how do those messages change the way we interact with each other? This course will explore these questions in the context of the city you have come to live in for the next four years. We will begin by critically examining the story visitors and residents learn when they walk the Freedom Trail—whose stories are told? What do those narratives say about what this city is? We will be part of the debate about what it means to be represented (or not) on the city landscape. This course will teach you to see the cityscape as a book to be read—a book whose meaning you can shape. After examining these questions, we will make our own decisions about what stories need to be told: the course will culminate in creating a digital map and our own walking tour presented to the public.

 

 

SEXISM AND POLITICS

(Engaged Scholarship Course)

Sparsha Saha


The “Engaged Scholarship” components of this course include multiple mandatory activities outside of regular class hours. Dates of the Spring 2019 activities will be announced in the first class meeting.


Today, the United States Congress is 19.4% female. That statistic trails the world average of 23.3%, with Nordic, European, sub- Saharan African, and Asian countries achieving better gender balance in national legislatures than the U.S. Some scholars contend that when women run, they are no more likely to win or lose compared to their male counterparts, though they are simply less likely to run in the first place. Other scholars identify a strong correlation between voting and sexist attitudes, notably in the 2016 U.S. election. But the puzzle persists: what accounts for the persistently low levels of female political representation in American politics, particularly since the United States boasts some of the highest levels of female participation in the labor market, especially in executive positions? Our course explores this question as it examines how prejudicial attitudes about women manifest themselves in American political life and society. In Unit 1, we begin by examining the popular argument that women should have more political representation because they would be better political leaders. In this unit, you will also have a chance to engage in the Harvard community by interviewing peers, neighbors, and other members of Harvard Square to get a sense of beliefs about women in politics. In Unit 2, we turn our attention to recent case studies, including Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, to investigate how gender stereotypes may or may not have played a role in the outcomes of their political races. Finally, in Unit 3, you will contribute to the scholarship in this field, by researching the phenomenon that Massachusetts lags behind other states when it comes to female political representation at the state and gubernatorial level. We will partner with the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (www.mwpc.org) to help them address this problem at the state level by writing a policy paper with recommendations that draw on your research into this issue.